Dbq Essay Ap World History Slavery Syllabus

1750-1914 (8 weeks) Topics for Discussion: 1. Cultural and Intellectual Changes (Renaissance, Reformation, Enlightenment) 2. Revolutions and Independence Movements (North America, France, Haiti, Latin  America) 3. Nationalism and the Nation-State (Italy, Germany, Zionism, Latin America) 4. Industrialization (Technology, gender and social structures) 5. Reform and Reaction (Ottoman Empire, Russia, China, Japan Meiji) 6. Imperialism and Its Impact (India, Africa, Japan, Emancipation, Serfdom, Women  Roles  Part VI:  Revolutions Reshape the World, 1750-1870,   the word revolution is used in several  senses: in the political sense of governmental overthrow, as in France and the Americas, in the  metaphorical sense of radical transformative change, as in the Industrial Revolution; and in the  broadest sense of the perception of a profound change in circumstances and worldview.   Technology and environment lie at the core of these developments.  With the rapid ascendancy  of the Western belief that science and technology could overcome all challenges environmental  otherwise technology became an instrument not only of transformation but also of domination, to  the point of threatening the integrity and autonomy of cultural traditions in non industrial lands. Chapter 21 Revolutionary Changes in the Atlantic World, 1750-1850 A. Lecture B. Timeline Activity:  1750-1875  C. Demarest Model of Empire (group activity) D. Chronology Chart:  The Americas, Europe: 1750-1800 CE E. The Human Record :   Women Suffrage: A Woman’s Protest  p. 288 F. Change Over Time Essay: The Role of Revolutions Chapter 22 The Early Industrial Revolution, 1760-1851 A. lecture B. Chronology Chart:  Technology, Economy, Society, and Politics: 1750-

Course Text and other Reading:

Main Text: World Civilizations: The Global Experience, Peter N. Stearns, etc. Al., New York: Pearson Longman; 5th AP Ed., 2007.

Readers:

  • Students will read and analyze selected primary sources (documents, images, and maps) in:

Ø  Kevin Reilly, Worlds of History: A Comparative Reader, Bedford St. Martins, 2009.

Ø  Alfred J. Andrea and James H. Overfield, The Human Record Sources of Global History, Vol. I & II, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2009.

 

Supplemental Texts:

  • Students will analyze quantitative sources through study and interpretation of graphs, charts, and tables in:

Ø  Robert W. Strayer, Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources, Bedford St. Martin, 2009.

Ø  J. Bentley, and H. Ziegler., Traditions and Encounters, 5th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2011.

 

Secondary Sources:

Ø  Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel, Norton & Co., 1999.

Ø  Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart, Anchor, 1994.

Ø  Mintz, Sydney. “Pleasure, Profit, and Satiation.” In Seeds of Change. 112-129. Washington, DC. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.

Ø  Finney, Ben. “The Other One-Third of the Globe.” Journal of World History, Vol. 5, No. 2. 1994

Ø  Christian, David. “The Case for ‘Big History’”, Journal of World History, 2, No. 2 (Fall 1991)

Ø  Christian, David. “Silk Roads or Steppe Roads? The Silk Roads in World History,” Journal of World History 11.1 (Spring 2000).

Ø  Natalie Angier, “Furs for Evening, But Cloth Was the Stone Age Standby,” in Reilly, Worlds of History, 1999.

Ø  Elise Boulding, “Women and the Agricultural Revolution,” in Reilly, Worlds of History, 1976.

Ø  Gerda Lerner, “The Urban Revolution: Origins of Patriarchy,” in Reilly, Worlds of History, 1986.

Ø  Flynn, Dennis O., and Arturo Giráldez. “Born with a ‘Silver Spoon’: The Origin of World Trade in 1571,” Journal of World History, Vol. 6, no. 2, (1995): 201-221.

 

Themes

The AP World History themes will be used throughout the course to identify the broad patterns and processes that explain change and continuity over time. Our study of World History in reading, discussion, and writing will incorporate themes including:

  1. Interaction between humans and the environment

Ø  Demography and disease

Ø  Migration

Ø  Patterns of settlement

Ø  Technology

 

  1. Development and interaction of Cultures

Ø  Religions

Ø  Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies

Ø  Science and technology

Ø  The arts and architecture

 

  1. State-building, expansion, and conflict

Ø  Political structures and forms of governance

Ø  Empires

Ø  Nations and nationalism

Ø  Revolts and revolutions

Ø  Regional, transregional, and global structures and organizations

 

  1. Creation, expansion, and interaction of Economic systems

Ø  Agricultural and pastoral production

Ø  Trade and commerce

Ø  Labor systems

Ø  Industrialization

Ø  Capitalism and socialism

 

  1. Development and transformation of Social structures

Ø  Gender roles and relations

Ø  Family and kinship

Ø  Racial and ethnic constructions

Ø  Social and economic classes

 

These AP World History Themes will be used throughout the course as a way to analyze certain civilizations and cultures. The SPICE acronym will be used to help students easily remember each of the five themes.

Course Schedule

Unit 1 (1st Nine Weeks): To 600 B.C.E.—Technological and Environmental Transformations

Primary Text: Stearns, Chapter 1

Key Concepts:

Ø  Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth

Ø  Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies

Ø  Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral and Urban Societies

 

Topics for Overview include:

Ø  Prehistoric Societies

Ø  From Foraging to Agricultural and Pastoral Societies

Ø  Early Civilizations: Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, the Americas, Africa, and Oceania

 

Special Focus:

Ø  What is a Civilization?

Ø  Periodization

 

Activities and Skill Development:

Ø  Students will be able to define history, humanity and civilization and critically evaluate periodizations constructed by historians.

Ø  Students will examine a different college-level text to find these definitions and compare findings with a new group.

Ø  Students will read the introduction to David Christian’s The Case for Big History for homework and compare it to the findings of when history begins according to the various authors explored during class

Ø  Students will discuss and debate if studying world history requires the help of archaeologists, anthropologists, astronomers, and geologists.

  • Students will label and identify the core and foundational civilizations where agriculture flourished and place on a timeline. These will include:

Ø  Mesopotamia in the Tigris and Euphrates River Valleys

Ø  Egypt in the Nile River Valley

Ø  Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley

Ø  Shang in the Yellow River or Huang He Valley

Ø  Olmecs in Mesoamerica

Ø  Chavín in Andean South America

Ø  Sub-Saharan Africa

Ø  Papua New Guinea

 

Items placed on the timeline will come from their textbooks and additional events and people from secondary readings will be included at the end of

the unit. This will help students understand periodization. Students will come to realize by comparing primary texts to other supplemental texts that dates and events may be contradictory/inconsistent with our text and will learn to understand diverse models of periodization.

  • First annotation assignment to be explained and students will annotate the Angier article. Students will discuss reading.
  • First summation assignment to be explained and students will summarize Boudling article. Students will read the selection and will evaluate the author’s argument. Students will discuss the reading following the written assignment.
  • Annotation/Summation assignment on the Lerner reading. Students will address in their written responses and orally during discussion the reasons for the rise of patriarchal societies and the impact this had on the role of women.

 

Unit 2 (1st Nine Weeks): 600 B.C.E.-600 C.E.—Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies

Primary Text: Stearns, Chapter 2-5

Key Concepts:

  • Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions
  • Development of States and Empires
  • Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange

 

Topics for Overview include:

  • Classical Civilizations
  • Major Belief Systems
  • Early Trade Networks

 

Special Focus:

Ø  Animism focusing on Australasia and Sub-Saharan Africa

Ø  Buddhism and Hinduism

Ø  Confucianism and Daoism

Ø  Judaism and Christianity

  • The Americas: Moche and Maya
  • Bantu Migrations
  • The Silk Road
  • Indian Ocean Trade
  • China: Imperial Structure and Confucian Society

 

Activities and Skill Development:

  • Belief Systems Group Project

Ø  In small groups, students will research and present a major world religion/belief system examining origin, founder, deity, core beliefs, role of women, major texts, diffusion, and contact with other religions.

  • Students will use the Conrad-Demarest Comparison of Empires to write a comparison essay: methods of political control in the Classical period. Students will compare two of the following:

Ø  Han China

Ø  Mauryan/Gupta India

Ø  Imperial Rome

Ø  Persian Empire

Ø  Mesoamerica: Teotihuacan, Maya city-states

Ø  Andean South America: Moche

  • Students will evaluate the causes and consequences of the decline of the Han, Roman, and Gupta empires using a cause-effect chart.
  • Bantu Migrations

Ø  Students will analyze the environmental impact of the Bantu people on sub-Saharan Africa. Students will create cause and effect charts as well as a map showing the Bantu migration along with the different climate and ecological zones.

  • Snapshot Map Lesson (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Students will use a snapshot map and change analysis chart to analyze the changes and continuities in long-distance trade networks: Eurasian Silk Roads, Trans-Saharan caravan routes, Indian Ocean sea lanes, Mediterranean Sea lanes.

Ø  Students will examine: new technologies, innovations in maritime technologies, changes in farming and irrigation techniques, and the effects of the spread of disease on empires.

  • Students will write a DBQ using the 2009 Guided DBQ on Buddhism in China created by Bill Strickland. Students will analyze the documents to write a clear, cohesive essay arguing the responses to the spread of Buddhism in China using the documents as evidence to support those arguments.
  • Primary Source Analysis

Ø  Students will analyze written documents concerning patriarchy and women’s voices in the Classical Era.

Ø  Students will use the written documents in Strayer’s Ways of the World p. 262-271 and answer the analysis questions followed by class discussion of responses.

 

 

Ø  Students will analyze visual documents concerning representations of the Buddha.

Ø  Students will use the visual documents in Strayer’s Ways of the World p. 227-235 and answer the analysis questions followed by class discussion of responses.

 

Written Sources from Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext:

Ø  Fu Xuan. How Sad it is to be a Woman. 3rd century C.E.

Ø  Ban Zhao. Lessons for Women. Late First Century C.E.

Ø  Psalms of the Sisters. First Century B.C.E.

Ø  Livy. History of Rome. Late First Century B.C.E. to Early First Century C.E.

 

Visual Sources from Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext:

Ø  Footprints of the Buddha (Courtesy, John Eskanazi Ltd, London. Photo: A.C. Cooper N & P Ltd, London)

Ø  A Classic Indian Buddha (Image copyright © The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource, NY)

Ø  A Bodhisattva of Compassion: Kannon of 1,000 Arms (From The Concise History of Japanese Buddhist Sculpture, Bijutu Shuppan-sha. Photo: Lightstream)

Ø  The Chinese Maitreya Buddha (Nazima Kowail/Corbis)

Ø  The Amitabha Buddha (The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg. Photograph © The State Hermitage Museum)

 

Unit 3 (2nd Nine Weeks): 600-1450 —Regional and Transregional Interactions

Primary Text: Stearns, Chapter 6-15

Key Concepts:

Ø  Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks

Ø  Continuity and Innovation of State forms and Their Interactions

Ø  Increased Economic Productive Capacity and its Consequences

 

Topics for Overview include:

Ø  Byzantine Empire and Germanic Europe

Ø  Islam

Ø  Crusades

Ø  Sui, Tang, Song and Ming Empires

Ø  Delhi Sultanate

Ø  The Americas

Ø  The Turkish Empires

Ø  Italian City-States

Ø  Kingdoms and Empires in Africa

Ø  The Mongols

Ø  Trading Networks in the Postclassical World

 

Special Focus:

Ø  Islam and the Establishment of an Empire

Ø  Polynesian Migrations in Oceania

Ø  Empires in the Americas: Aztecs and Incas

Ø  Expansion of Trade in the Indian Ocean—the Swahili Coast of East Africa

 

Activities and Skill Development:

  • The Silk Roads Research Project Lesson (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Students will read and annotate David Christian’s “Silk Roads or Steppe Roads? The Silk Roads in World History,” Journal of World History 11.1 (Spring 2000).

Ø  Students will assume the role of a trade item that was transported along the Silk Road and research it.

Ø  Students will write an autobiography as a first person narrative describing the places they travel, how they are exchanged, etc.

Ø  Students will analyze written documents concerning early travelers’ tales and observations.

Ø  Students will use the written documents in Strayer’s Ways of the World p. 356-366 and answer the analysis questions followed by class discussion of responses.

  • Leader Analysis of Muhammad

Ø  Student will use a leader analysis chart to record important specific information about Muhammad in the political, economic, and social fields

  • Vikings v. Polynesians (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Before the lesson, students will have read and annotated Ben Finney’s “The Other One Third of the Globe,” Journal of World History, Vol. 5, No. 2, 1994.

Ø  Students will view selections from NOVA film Vikings, PBS, 2000 and the David Attenborough film The Lost Gods of Easter Island

Ø  Students will use materials from a variety of sources to research long and short term effects of the Viking and Polynesian migrations.

Ø  Students will present them and debate the most significant impact.

Ø  In groups, students will draw an outline of a group member lying down on large butcher paper. Each body part represents a place to write characteristics of early American culture groups (Maya, Aztec, and Inca) according to AP World History themes (SPICE).

  • After seeing the National Geographic program “Inca Mummies: Secrets of the Lost World”, students will assess the impact that archaeology and anthropology have had on the study of history by answering the discussion questions provided. Students will judge the impact archaeology and anthropology have on the study of history.

 

 

  • Compare and contrast the Mongol impact on China, Persia, and Russia

Ø  Students will SPICE the Mongol impact on China, Persia, and Russia and then write a comparative essay choosing two of the three regions.

  • Plague Internet Research Project Lesson (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Students will view “The Black Death in the 14th Century” CNN’s Millennium Series

Ø  Students will discuss reactions to segments

Ø  Students will work independently in the computer lab using a list of suggested websites to answer a series of focus questions

Ø  Students will also print at least four documents used and evaluate them for point of view

  • Compare and Contrast Bantu and Oceanic/Polynesian Migrations (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Students will work in small groups to create a Venn diagram or comparative chart showing the similarities and differences between the Bantu and Oceanic/Polynesian Migrations

Ø  Assessment: Students will write a comparative essay.

 

Written Sources from Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext:

Ø  Huili. A Biography of the Tripitaka Master, 7th century C.E.

Ø  Xuanzang. Record of the Western Region, 7th century C.E.

Ø  Marco Polo. The Travels of Marco Polo, 1299

Ø  Ibn Battuta, Travels in Asia and Africa, 1354

 

Unit 4 (2nd & 3rd Nine Weeks): 1450-1750 — Global Interactions

Primary Text: Stearns, Chapter 16-22

Key Concepts:

Ø  Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

Ø  New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production

Ø  State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion

 

Topics for Overview include:

Ø  Ming and Qing rule in China

Ø  Japanese Shogunates

Ø  The Trading Networks of the Indian Ocean

Ø  Effects of the Continued Spread of Belief Systems

 

Special Focus:

Ø  Islamic Empires: Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal

Ø  The Columbian Exchange

Ø  The Atlantic Slave Trade

Ø  Changes in Western Europe—The Rise of the West

 

Activities and Skill Development:

  • Students will read Strayer’s introduction to Unit 4 “The Early Modern Era”. Students will debate how the era 1450-1750 should be characterized using the information provided in the text. Students will summarize the introduction and include whether or not they agree or disagree with Strayer’s classification of this time period.
  • Students will SPICE and map major land based empires: Russia, China (Qing/Ming), Mughal, and Ottoman

Ø  Students will be able to identify the problems of control and expansion that each of these empires had to face.

  • Born With a Silver Spoon Lesson

Ø  In groups of three, students will read the “Role of Silver,” article from the website http://socyberty.com/history/the-role-of-silver-in-european-chinese-trade/ or preprinted copies. Using the “Document Analysis” (Stearns) graphic organizer, students will ascertain point of view/reference and main idea of the article. Students will discuss how there might be problems with the main idea of the article.

Ø  Next, students will read Born with a ‘Silver Spoon’: The Origin of World Trade in 1571 by Dennis O. Flynn, Arturo Giráldez; Journal of World History, Vol. 6, 1995 pages 201-206 only. Conclusion can be included if need be. Using the “Document Analysis” (Stearns) graphic organizer, students will ascertain point of view/reference and main idea of the article. Students will then Venn diagram the two articles showing the various similarities and differences.

Ø  Students will reflect by answering 3 journal questions relating to how point of view can change the interpretation of an historical event.

  • Journey of Sugar Lesson (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Students will watch the film, “Credit Where its Due” and read the Mintz article for homework.

Ø  Students will create a poster that shows the origins of sugar, how it migrated westward and ended up in the New World.

Ø  Students will explain how sugar created the prototype for the factory of the industrial revolution and the other social, political, economic, and environmental changes that followed plantation agriculture.

Ø  In groups, students will be assigned one of the five World History themes. Students will focus on that theme as they trace the journey of sugar through space and time.

 

 

  • Video: America Before Columbus

Ø  Columbian Exchange Poster: students will show the global impact of the Columbian Exchange using themes and present that on a poster to present to the class.

Ø  Students will create a T-chart showing the goods, technologies, people, plants, animals and diseases that were transferred from one hemisphere to another.

Ø  Students will analyze visual sources concerning early contacts between Europeans and Native Americans.

Ø  Students will use the visual documents in Strayer’s Ways of the World p. 664-671 and answer the analysis questions followed by class discussion of responses.

  • Students will create CCOT charts for the social and economic transformations that occurred in the Americas as a result of contact with Western Europe.

Ø  Students will write the 2005 change over time free response question from the AP World History exam.

Ø  Students will read Olaudah Equiano’s “The African Slave Trade” narrative focusing on descriptors that tell the conditions of a slave ship.

Ø  Students will analyze visual sources of the layout of a slave ship and images of slaves on the slave ship to determine the conditions as well.

Ø  Students will watch a clip from the film Amistad and judge if Equiano’s description of the conditions of the slave ship were accurately depicted in the film in a short written response.

Ø  Students will be asked in what ways they would change the scene in order to make it more accurate.

  • Change Analysis Chart Lesson (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  In small groups students will complete a change analysis chart showing the most significant changes in trade between two periods (600-1750)

Ø  In groups, students will compare charts for completeness.

Ø  Students will write a change over time essay analyzing the changes and continuities in the expansion of regional trade networks to global trade networks from 600-1750.

 

 

Ø  Students will utilize a series of documents and quantitative data in document-based question III on page D-10 of Stearns text. Students will use the documents to evaluate attitudes about the role Native American labor served in the Spanish colonies in the Americas in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Ø  § Graph—Silver Production in Spanish America, 1516-1660

Ø  § Graph—Population Decline in New Spain, 1520-1820

Ø  § Document—The Laws and Ordinances newly made by His Majesty [Charles I] for the Government of the Indies and Good Treatment and Preservation of the Indians, Spain, 1542

Ø  § Document—Guaman Poma de Ayala’s excerpt from New Chronicle and Good Government, Guaman Poma de Ayala, ca. 1615

Ø  § Document—Antonio Vasquez de Espinosa’s “The Potosi Mine and Indian Forced Labor in Peru”

Ø  § Graph—A comparison of human livestock populations in central Mexico

Ø  § Chart—Estimated Slave Imports into the Americas by Importing Region, 1519-1866

 

Visual Sources from Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext:

Ø  Disaster Foretold (Biblioteca Nacional Madrid/Gianni Dagli Orti/The Art Archive)

Ø  Montezuma and Cortes (The Granger Collection, New York)

Ø  The Massacre of the Nobles (Bridgeman-Giraudon/Art Resource, NY)

Ø  The Spanish Retreat from Tenochtitlan (The Rout of La Noche Triste [June 30, 1520], Lienzo de Tlaxcala, Pl 18. Library of Congress)\

Ø  Smallpox: Disease and Defeat (Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Florence)

 

Visual Sources from the Internet:

Ø  Position of the Africans in the deck of the ships. issworldhistory.forumotion.net

Ø  The slave ship Brookes. www2.volstate.edu

Ø  Slaves being moved to the coast of Africa destined for St. Domingue, 1786. http://www.brh.org.uk/gallery/slavery.html

 

Unit 5 (3rd & 4th Nine Weeks): 1750-1900 — Industrialization and Global Integration

Primary Text: Stearns, Chapter 23-27

Key Concepts:

Ø  Industrialization and Global Capitalism

Ø  Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

Ø  Nationalism, Revolution and Reform

Ø  Global Migration

 

Topics for Overview include:

Ø  English Revolutions

Ø  Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment

Ø  American Revolution

Ø  French Revolution

Ø  Haitian Revolution

Ø  Latin American Revolution

Ø  Demographic Changes

Ø  The End of the Atlantic Slave Trade

Ø  Industrial Revolution and its Impact

Ø  Rise of Nationalism

Ø  Imperialism and its Impact on the World

 

Special Focus:

Ø  Decline of Imperial China and Rise of Imperial Japan

Ø  19th-Century Imperialism: Sub-Saharan Africa, South and Southeast Asia

Ø  Comparing Revolutions: French, American, Latin American, Spanish American, Haitian

Ø  Changes in Production in Europe and the Global Impact of Those Changes

 

Activities and Skill Development:

Ø  In groups, students will discuss how problems and conditions, that the leaders of the revolutions wanted to change, might be solved with political independence from the previous regime.

  • Students will read various primary sources including:

Ø  § Excerpts from Locke and Montesquieu

Ø  § Stamp Act, British Parliament, 1765

Ø  § Cahier of the Third Estate of Dourdan, 29 March, 1789

Ø  § Hatian Cahiers, 1789

Ø  § Father Hidalgo, “Grito de Dolores,” 1810

Ø  § Simon Bolivar, Kingston, Jamaica, September 6, 1815

  • Students will consider a specific list of questions in their discussion.
  • Students will respond to the following Journal Entry: Did the discussion lead to plans for overthrowing the regime?
  • Students will read and annotate excerpts from:
  • The Constitution of the United States, 1787
  • The French Constitution of 1793
  • The Mexican Constitution of 1824
  • The Proclamation of Toussaint L’Ouverture
  • Simon Bolivar, “Message to the Congress of Angostura” 1819

 

 

  • Students will create a comparative analysis of the causes and phases of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain or the United States with Russia or Japan and write a comparative essay.
  • Students will create a Compare/Contrast chart comparing the U.S. or French Revolution with one of the following revolutions:

Ø  Haiti 1798

Ø  Latin American 1820

Ø  Japan 1867

Ø  Mexico 1911

Ø  Russia 1905

  • Students will create a change analysis chart tracing the demographic shift from 1450 to 1914 in any one of the following regions:

Ø  Latin America

Ø  Western Europe

Ø  North America

Ø  East Asia

  • Students will create a cause/effect chart on the Industrial Revolution in the West and on any one revolution of their choice.
  • Primary Source Analysis

Ø  Students will analyze visual sources concerning The Scramble for Africa.

Ø  Students will use the visual documents in Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext p. 960-967 and answer the analysis questions followed by class discussion of responses.

  • Hawaiian Colonization v. British Colonialism

Ø  Students will research how indigenous people in Oceania/Hawaii were affected by British colonialism and compare that with the effects of British colonialism in India.

Ø  Students will compile their information and present it in a graphic organizer.

  • Students will read Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart and create a change analysis chart and analyze the cultural/intellectual changes and continuities that occurred in the Igbo culture (Nigeria) as a result of European colonization during the time period 1800-1900 discussing the causes of the changes and the reasons for the continuities.

Ø  Students will use this information to write a change over time essay.

  • Japanese v. Western Imperialism (Ryba L. Epstein)

Ø  Students will access a list of documents and readings given to them on a handout

Ø  Students will either take careful notes or print off relevant sections of the documents.

Ø  In small groups, students will discuss and come to a consensus on a list of questions.

Ø  Students will write a comparative essay on the Western and Asian views of imperialism

 

 

Ø  Students will utilize a series of documents, maps and quantitative data in the 2003 released DBQ about indentured servitude in the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will also assess the connections between abolition of plantation slavery and increased migrations from Asian countries to the Americas.

 

Visual Sources from Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext:

Ø  Prelude to the Scramble (Private Collection/Archives Charmet/The Bridgeman Art Library)

Ø  Conquest and Competition (Alinari/Art Resource, NY)

Ø  From the Cape to Cairo (The Granger Collection, NY)

Ø  A French Critique of the Boer War (Mary Evans Picture Library/The Image Works)

Ø  The Ethiopian Exception (© Trustees of the British Museum)

 

Unit 6 (4th Nine Weeks): 1900-Present — Accelerating Global Change and Realignments

Primary Text: Stearns, Chapter 28-35

Key Concepts:

Ø  Science and the Environment

Ø  Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

Ø  New Conceptualizations of Global Economy and Culture

 

Topics for Overview include:

Ø  Crisis and Conflict in the Early 20th Century

  • Anti-Imperial Movements
  • World War I
  • Russian, Chinese, and Mexican Revolutions
  • Depression
  • Rise of Militaristic and Fascist Societies
  • World War II

Ø  Internationalization

  • Decolonization
  • The Cold War
  • International Organizations
  • Post-Cold War
  • World Globalization

 

Special Focus:

Ø  World Wars

Ø  Causes and Consequences of the Great Depression

Ø  Rise of Communism in China, Russia and Cuba

Ø  Responses to Western Involvement in Sub-Saharan Africa: Imperialism, the Cold War, and International Organizations

 

Activities and Skill Development:

Ø  Students will complete a change analysis chart tracing the changes and continuities in world trade from 1900-2000 CE in any one of the following regions

  • Latin America
  • North America
  • Western Europe
  • Eastern Europe
  • Southwest Asia
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • South Asia
  • East Asia

Ø  Students will complete a change analysis chart tracing any changes in environment and demography from 1900 to the present in any one region

  • Latin America
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Eastern Europe
  • South Asia
  • East Asia
  • Oceania

Ø  Students will complete a change analysis chart tracing the transformation or impact of technology including manufacturing, transportation, and communications from 1750 to 2000 in any one region and write a change over time essay.

  • North America
  • Western Europe
  • Eastern Europe
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Southwest Asia
  • North Africa
  • South Asia
  • East Asia

Ø  Students will create cause/effect charts on medical and environmental innovations, focusing on demographic consequences (Ryba Epstein). These may include:

  • Antibiotics
  • Public health control of sewage
  • Birth control
  • Green Revolution
  • Vaccination

Ø  Students will create maps and change analysis charts for the changing political map following World War I and World War II

Ø  Students will create cause and effect charts for World War I and World War II. Students will debate that World War I was a continuation of World War II.

 

 

Ø  Primary Source Analysis

  • Students will analyze visual sources representing independence.
  • They will use the visual documents in Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext p. 1122-1131 and answer the analysis questions followed by class discussion of responses.

Ø  Cause and Effect Charts (Ryba L. Epstein)

  • In small groups, students will create cause and effect charts for other conflicts and decolonization.
  • Each group will have a different conflict.

Ø  § Algeria

Ø  § Vietnam

Ø  § Angola

Ø  § India

Ø  § Gold Coast

  • Students will display their charts and students will circle the rooms making notes of similarities and differences among the groups’ products.

Ø  Ethnic Violence Posters (Ryba L. Epstein)

  • Students will work in small groups to create posters for selected examples of ethnic conflict from various world regions

Ø  § Armenia

Ø  § The Holocaust

Ø  § Cambodia

Ø  § Rwanda

  • Posters will show causes and impact of each conflict

Ø  Multi-media Presentations (Ryba L. Epstein)

  • In small groups, students will research individuals and groups who opposed violence and war.
  • Students will create a multi-media presentation of their own choice to explain or express the impact of these individuals and groups

Ø  § Various artists such as Picasso

Ø  § Antinuclear groups and individuals

Ø  § Gandhi

Ø  § Martin Luther King Jr.

Ø  Women in War DBQ—20th Century (Ryba L. Epstein)

  • Students will analyze documents to determine what shaped women’s attitudes toward warfare and the impact of warfare on women’s lives in the 20th century.
  • Students will write an essay that follows the structure of the DBQ generic rubric.

 

Visual Sources from Strayer’s Ways of the World Docutext:

Ø  Non-Co-operation Tree and Mahatma Gandhi (© British Library Board, PIB 170/2)

Ø  African National Congress (Special Collections, Senate House Library, University of London)

Ø  Vietnamese Independence and Victory over the United States (Laurie Steelink/Track16/SmartArt, Inc.)

Ø  Winning a Jewish National State (The Central Zionist Archives, Jerusalem)

Ø  A Palestinian Nation in the Making (Palestine Poster Project Archives/Visual Connection Archive)

 

Writing Assignments

Each unit includes writing assignments designed to develop the skills necessary for creating well-evidenced essays on historical topics highlighting clarity and precision.

Short Document Analysis: Students analyze documents from the course primary source readers. Students will analyze sources for point of view, subject, occasion, speaker, purpose, audience, and historical context. These skills will be applied throughout the course.

Document Based Question (DBQ): Students analyze evidence from a variety of sources in order to develop a coherent written argument that has a thesis supported by relevant historical evidence. Students will apply multiple historical thinking skills as they examine a particular historical problem or question.

Change and Continuity Over Time (CCOT): Students identify and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time and across geographic regions. They will also connect these historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place, and to broader regional, national, or global processes.

Comparative Essay (COMP): Students compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and/or geographical contexts. Students will also synthesize information by connecting insights from one historical context to another, including the present.

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